STRIP INTERCROPPING OF YELLOW LUPINE WITH OATS AND SPRING TRITICALE: PROXIMITY EFFECT

  • Lech Gałęzewski Department of Plant Production and Experimenting, UTP University of Science and Technology in Bydgoszcz, prof. S. Kaliskiego 7, 85-796 Bydgoszcz, Poland
  • Iwona Jaskulska Department of Plant Production and Experimenting, UTP University of Science and Technology in Bydgoszcz, prof. S. Kaliskiego 7, 85-796 Bydgoszcz, Poland
  • Mariusz Piekarczyk Department of Plant Production and Experimenting, UTP University of Science and Technology in Bydgoszcz, prof. S. Kaliskiego 7, 85-796 Bydgoszcz, Poland
  • Dariusz Jaskulski Department of Plant Production and Experimenting, UTP University of Science and Technology in Bydgoszcz, prof. S. Kaliskiego 7, 85-796 Bydgoszcz, Poland

Abstract

Background. The work uses the results from two field experiments on mixed sowings carried out in the years 2005–2012 at the experimental station in Mochełek (53o 13’ N; 17o 51’ E). The aim of the studies was to find the response of yellow lupine to the neighbouring occurrence of oats and spring triticale, as well as the effect of Fabaceae on spring cereals and an estimation of the production effects of strip intercropping of those species.


Material and methods. The experimental factor was the position of a plant row on the plot: four rows into the plot away from the neighbouring species. The first row (contact row) was situated 12.5 cm away from the first row of the neighbouring species. The experimental unit was the subsequent plant rows, each 4 meter-long. The proximity of yellow lupine and oat plants was studied in the first experiment and yellow lupine and spring triticale in the second experiment.


Results. The proximity of oats was unfavourable to yellow lupine plants, and the effect was statistically confirmed in the row directly adjacent to oats. A negative effect also occurred in the subsequent row, although it was smaller and in most cases not significant. The proximity of spring triticale was also unfavourable to yellow lupine plants, but to a smaller extent than in the case of oats and was limited only to the first, directly adjacent row of yellow lupine. On the other hand spring triticale, and especially oats, responded positively to the proximity of yellow lupine, but the effect occurred only in the first plant row.


Conclusion. It was estimated that in strip intercropping of oats with yellow lupine and of spring triticale with yellow lupine, with 3 meter-long strips, up to 13.9% higher oat yields and 5.57% triticale yields may be obtained, but at the same time lower, by 0.62-2.13%, yellow lupine yields may be obtained than in pure sowing.

Published
Jun 30, 2017
Section
Original paper