THE YIELD OF INDETERMINATE AND DETERMINATE CULTIVARS OF WHITE LUPIN (Lupinus albus L.) DEPENDING ON PLANT DENSITY

  • Magdalena Borowska Department of Agrotechnology, UTP University of Science and Technology in Bydgoszcz prof. S. Kaliskiego 7, 85-796 Bydgoszcz, Poland
  • Janusz Prusiński Department of Agrotechnology, UTP University of Science and Technology in Bydgoszcz prof. S. Kaliskiego 7, 85-796 Bydgoszcz, Poland
  • Ewa Kaszkowiak Department of Agrotechnology, UTP University of Science and Technology in Bydgoszcz prof. S. Kaliskiego 7, 85-796 Bydgoszcz, Poland
  • Grażyna Olszak Department of Agrotechnology, UTP University of Science and Technology in Bydgoszcz prof. S. Kaliskiego 7, 85-796 Bydgoszcz, Poland

Abstract

Background. Intensification of breeding and agronomic techniques in white lupine have given new types of cultivars differing in their reaction to plant density and some morphological traits of plants that are dependent on the technology of cultivation. The aim of the study was to determine the number of plants per unit of area of morphologically diversified cultivars of white lupine that would provide the maximum seed yield with the minimum usage of expensive sowing material.


Material and methods. The 2­way field experiment was conducted in a randomized split­plot design at the Experimental Station in Mochełek (Poland). The experimental factors included two cultivars of white lupine: indeterminate cv. Butan and the determinate cv. Boros, as well as four plant densities: 40, 60, 80 and 100 plants per m2.


Results. The average lupine seed yield was 3.49 Mg·ha-1 and was differentiated over four years by weather conditions, especially by the sum and distribution of rainfall. Indeterminate cv. Butan had a 22% higher yield than the determinate cv. Boros. The highest seed yields from cv. Butan (4.05 Mg·ha-1) were obtained with a plant density before harvest of 77 per m2, and from cv. Boros (3.83 Mg·ha-1) with 96 plants per m2. Significantly more pods containing more seeds were developed by plants of the indeterminate cv. Butan. Plant density affected significantly only the number of pods in plants of both cultivars; more pods were obtained from plants growing at the lowest density. The 1000-seed weight and seed number per pod mainly contributed to the yield increase in both cultivars as the density increased from 40 to 80 plants per m2.


Conclusion. The factor most strongly determining seed yield, the number of pods, seeds per pod and weight of 1000 seeds was the course of weather in the years of the research. Increasing plant density resulted in an increase in the seed yield. A significantly higher yield was obtained from indeterminate cv. Butan at a density of 77 plants per m2, while for determinate cv. Boros the highest yield was with 96 plants per m2.

Published
Jun 30, 2017
Section
Original paper